Live Simply With Style
 
       
People of the Riviera Maya
 

At the Grand Sirenis, most guests hail from Canada, then, the United States. Definitely, English is the predominant language. Quebecois French comes in second.

Of course, most workers are Mexican or Mayan. The Mexican people tended to be taller and thinner than the Mayan who are powerfully built – well suited to live in the jungles of the area. We’re impressed with the industrious – and persistent – nature of these indigenous peoples. Almost always, we’re politely and cheerfully greeted with “Hola,” “Buenos Dias,” “Buenos Tardes,” or “Buenos Noches.” Too, they’re patient and encouraging with our beginning Spanish!

While in Tulum’s market, you might encounter a group of Indians who have created animal identities with elaborate costumes. Notice the snake, the jaguar, and the owl. Too, there’s a Mayan princess.

Click on any image to see it larger.

 
     

Kayaker

Family Building Sand Castles

Family at Swim-Up Bar

Lifeguard

Kayaker

Family Building Sand Castles

Family at Swim-Up Bar

Lifeguard

     

Cement Mixer

Weed Whacker

Thatcher

Cement Mixer

Weed Whacker

Thatcher

     

Mayan Dancers 1

Mayan Dancers 2

Mayan Dancers 1

Mayan Dancers 1

Mayan Dancers 2

Mayan Dancers 3
     

 


All of our images on this website are available for sale.